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Why are BYOD Programs Beginning to Dominate K-12

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School districts from around the country are implementing BYOD (bring your own device) programs to help teachers deliver lessons from mobile apps while increasing student engagement.
Popularity of BYOD Programs  
In fact, over half of middle schools embrace BYOD programs and approximately three-fourths of high schools allow learning opportunities to come from mobile teaching apps and Smartphones.
McGraw-Hill and Kno, digital learning platform providers, have partnerships with over five dozen textbook providers and are creating compelling interactive content for the younger generation of digital natives. 
Smartphone-enabled learning software, for instance, helps convey otherwise complex lessons using multimedia like 3-D diagrams, games and relatable videos. Other Smartphone-ready apps enable students to share highlighted notes and even access multimedia content (e.g., videos and links) built into their downloaded textbooks. 
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.kno.textbooks
On top of these benefits, over 75 percent of parents report that their kids’ tablets foster classroom learning and even creativity, according to SecureEdge. 
Recent research also shows that approximately half of children ages five to eight have experience with tablets, and an encouraging 90 percent of students report that tablets facilitate their studying. 
The designers behind the mobile apps that help facilitate BYOD programs in schools gear most of their efforts to creating math games and puzzles that integrate the day’s lessons. This keeps learning fun and engaging for young kids, and perhaps accounts for some of BYOD’s success in school districts around the country. 
http://www.securedgenetworks.com/strategy-blog/BYOD-Coming-to-a-School-Near-You-Infographic
Reasons Behind BYOD’s Recent Success 
Many school districts are seizing the opportunity to capitalize on a growing trend – middle school and high school students already own tablets and Smartphones, and school districts want to incorporate engaging apps and digital learning modules into daily lessons using these already owned devices. 
BYOD Meets Existing Needs 
When elementary, middle and high schoolers bring their devices from home into the classroom it’s a great way to bridge the tech savviness of a younger generation with the financial and educational needs of school districts. 
Using a school’s preexisting (and secure) wireless network, the younger “digital native” generation is able to collaborate with one another on assignments, listen to learning podcasts and complete assignments on adaptive software that moves at each student’s pace of learning.  
Young students can safely access the school’s wireless network, which is protected according to the Children’s Internet Protection Act, to complete fun math puzzles or share notes before a big quiz. 
http://www.fcc.gov/guides/childrens-internet-protection-act
Buy-in From Teachers 
The recent success of BYOD programs in elementary and high schools stems from teacher interest and support, as well. More attention to effective classroom management and professional development, centering on changes in technology, has helped teachers keep pace with their students’ collective enthusiasm for learning using wireless technology. 
How BYOD Is Beginning to Dominate 
In short, BYOD programs are tapping into the digital native generation’s appetite for interactive learning on tablets and Smartphones.
At a time when school districts are looking to make use of interactive teaching tools but feel confined by budget demands, everyone from administrators and teachers to parents and their children are getting behind BYOD programs to enhance learning outcomes. 
The ability to quickly share highlighted notes, collaborate digitally with other students and listen to educational podcasts are all possibilities when school districts embrace BYOD programs. Best of all, young students are celebrating the move! 
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